Critical and Discursive Psychology at Massey

 

The School of Psychology at Massey University contains one of the largest groupings of psychologists in the Southern hemisphere who adopt critical, discursive and qualitative approaches in their work. There is a great deal of research expertise represented amongst. External grant income across the different interests is around nz$5,000,000 over the past 4 years. A number of books have recently appeared through international publishers, and an increasing number of students are completing Masters and Doctoral degrees.

Some details of academic members of the School with these interests are listed below

Professor Kerry P Chamberlain

MA Cant.

 

Expertise

Health Psychology, Research Methods, Social Psychology

Professional Interests

Health Psychology, Psychological Wellbeing, Qualitative Research, Research Methods, Social Psychology

Kerry Chamberlain is a Professor of Health Psychology at Massey University, Albany, AucklandNew Zealand. He is the co-editor of Qualitative Health Psychology: Theories and Methods (Sage; with Michael Murray), co-editor of Existential Meaning: Optimizing Human Development Across the Life Span (Sage; with Gary Reker) and co-author of Health Psychology: A Critical Introduction (Cambridge; with Antonia Lyons). He is currently preparing a text on qualitative research, Qualitative Research In Psychology: Critical Fundamentals and Strategic Practices (Sage), and he has published widely on health psychology and methodology in international peer-reviewed journals and in book chapters.


Kerry is a critical health psychologist whose current research interests focus on health in everyday life, with a particular interest in topics that will advance understandings and assistance to disadvantaged peoples. More specifically, his research interests include: 1) food and health (including medicalisation, social practices around food and healthy eating, dietary practices, and food supplementation); 2) media and health (including media representations of health issues generally, the understanding and uptake of media messages, the marketing of medications, and the mediation of health issues broadly in contemporary society); 3) the meanings of medication (including lay understandings of medications, consumption and the everyday use of medications, the changing nature of medications, especially in relation to functional foods and nutraceuticals); 4) everyday illness (illnesses that are recurring, not severe, and are generally treated with self-care or minor consultations, including mundane and ongoing illness, and the relation of these to understandings of the body and bodily functioning). He utilises mainly qualitative research methodologies in his research, predominantly critical discursive approaches, and innovative approaches, such as photo-elicitation, diaries, maps, and the use of material objects like personal possessions and photographs, to reveal the materiality and social practices of everyday life. These methodologies are being used in a current major project into homelessness in New Zealand funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Fund).

Current graduate doctoral supervision:

Helen Madden: (Doctor of Philosophy): Integrative medicine: Paradoxes for a contested practice.

Joanna Lyes: (Doctor of Philosophy): Beyond obesity: Narratives of the extra-ordinariness of major weight loss.

Trudie Cain: (Doctor of Philosophy): Weight and the wardrobe: clothing the fat body.

Gareth Rouch: (Doctor of Philosophy): The experience of fatherhood amongst low SES, economically active, co-resident fathers.

Cannis Tse: (Doctor of Philosophy): The life experiences of ageing among Chinese migrants in New Zealand.

Juan Chen: (Doctor of Clinical Psychology): A cultural approach to understanding and working with Chinese migrants in New Zealand.

Ros Munro: (Doctor of Clinical Psychology): Journeys through adolescence: Meaning-making in narratives constructed by teenage boys.

Recent Publications

Chamberlain, K. & Murray, M. (In press). Critical health psychology. In Fox, D., Prilleltensky, I., & Austen, S. (Eds.), Critical Psychology: An Introduction (2nd ed). London: Sage.

Chamberlain, K. & Hodgetts, D. (In press). Social psychology and media: Critical considerations. Social and Personality Psychology Compass.

Dalton, S., Madden, H., Chamberlain, K. Carr, S., & Lyons, A. C. (in press). 'It's gotten a bit old, charity': Young adults in New Zealand talk about poverty and aid appeals. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology.

Santiago, M., & Chamberlain, K. (In press). Psychologie de la santé et psychologie critique de la santé: Un positionnement politique pour la psychologie? Psychologie Française.

Chamberlain, K., & Murray, M. (2008). Qualitative research in health psychology. In C. Willig & W. Stainton Rogers (Eds.), Handbook of qualitative methods in psychology (pp. 390-406). London: Sage.

Barnett, A., Hodgetts, D., Nikora, L., Chamberlain, K., & Karapu, R. (2007). Child poverty and government policy: The contesting of symbolic power in newspaper constructions of families in need. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 17, 296-312.

Chamberlain, K. (2006). Health psychology. In A. Weatherall, M. Wilson, J. McDowall, & D. Harper (Eds.), An introduction to psychology in New Zealand. Auckland: Pearson.

Chamberlain, K. (2007). Research ethics and the protection of human participants. In I. M. Evans, J. J. Rucklidge, & M. O'Driscoll (Eds.), Professional Practice of Psychology in Aotearoa New Zealand (pp. 163-179). Wellington: New Zealand Psychological Society.

Groot, S., Ngata, R., Hodgetts, D., Nikora, L., Karapu, R., Chamberlian, K. (2007). Maori and community news constructions of Meningococcal B: The promotion of a moral obligation to vaccinate. New Zealand Journal of Media Studies 10, 37-46.

Hodgetts, D., & Chamberlain, K. (2007). Mediated communities: Considerations for applied social psychology. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 17, 411-414.

Hodgetts, D., Chamberlain, K., & Radley, A. (2007). Considering photographs never taken during photo-production projects. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 4, 263-280.

Hodgetts, D., Chamberlain, K., Scammell, M., Nikora, L., & Karapu, R. (2007). Constructing health news: Media production and the possibilities for a civic-oriented journalism. Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine, 12, 43-66.

Hodgetts, D., Radley, A., Chamberlain, K., & Hodgetts, A. (2007). Health inequalities and homelessness: Considering material, spatial and relational dimensions. Journal of Health Psychology, 12, 709-725.

Cherrington, J., Chamberlain, K., & Grixti, J. (2006). Relocating alcohol advertising research: Examining socially mediated relationships with alcohol. Journal of Health Psychology, 11, 209-222.

Hodgetts, D. & Chamberlain, K. (2006). Developing a critical media research agenda for health psychology. Journal of Health Psychology, 11, 317-327.

Hodgetts, D. & Chamberlain, K. (2006). Media and health: A continuing concern for health psychology. Journal of Health Psychology, 11, 171-174.

Loto, R., Hodgetts, D., Chamberlain, K., Nikora, L., Karapu, L., & Barnett, A. (2006). Pasifika in the news: The portrayal of Pacific peoples in the New Zealand press. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 16, 100-118.

Lyons, A. & Chamberlain, K. (2006). Health psychology: A critical introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

Dr Leigh Coombes

Lecturer
BEd, DipTchg, MA, PhD

 

Leigh Coombes is a Lecturer in critical psychology at Massey University, Turitea Campus, Palmerston North, New Zealand. She is on the editorial board of the Women’s Studies Journal.

Leigh has a long history of working as a narrative practitioner in community agencies and continues to practice as a Youth Justice Consultant in her community and alongside institutions where bicultural practice is privileged. Leigh was appointed to a lecturing position in the School of Psychology in 2003 where she teaches forensic psychology with an ethical commitment to social justice (undergraduate), psychology of women in the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes and postmodernism in psychology at graduate level.

Her research interests mainly focus on issues related to violence – violence against women, including intimate partner violence, and violence by women, including infanticide, with special attention to the historical, social and cultural conditions of gender and the effects of colonisation on particular communities. Understandings of lived experience of psychological wellbeing and the evaluation of interventions and their social and cultural effects are broader considerations that frame her research.

Leigh is interested in understanding the epistemological relationships between language, power and social justice. In particular she focuses on local issues of relevance for marginalised groups, disorder in communities, and interpersonal violence.

Recent Publications:

Refereed journals

Morgan, M., Coombes, L. & Campbell, B. (2006). Biculturalism, gender and critical social movements in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Still speaking from psychologies’ margins. Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 5, www.discourseunit.com/arcp/5

Aldridge, A., & Coombes, L. (2005). It’s really quite a delicate issue: GPs talk about domestic violence. Women’s Studies Journal, 19(2), 56-79.

Coombes, L. & Morgan, M. (2004). Narrative form and the morality of psychology’s gendering stories. Narrative Inquiry, 14, 303-322.

Coombes, L., Morgan, M., Tuffin, K., & Johnson, M. (2004). Critical Legal Psychology: Readings of the relationship between psychology and law informed by critical legal studies and critical psychology. International Journal of Critical Psychology, 11, 30-49.

Cheals, K., Morgan, M. & Coombes, L. (2003). Speaking from the margins: An analysis of women’s spirituality narratives. International Journal of Critical Psychology, 8, 55-72.

Coombes, L. & Morgan, M. (2002). Speaking of counter-narratives: Enunciative politics and commentary on memories of mother. Narrative Inquiry, 12, 375-379.

Coombes, L. (2001). Working the constitution of gendered subjectivities: An example from the nexus of law and psychology. International Journal of Critical Psychology, 1, 136-139.

Coombes, L., & Morgan, M. (2001). Speaking from the margins: A discourse analysis of ten women’s accounts of spirituality. The Australian Psychologist, 36, 10-18.

Morgan, M., & Coombes, L. (2001). Subjectivities and silences. Theorising an experience of silence as a speaking subject. Feminism and Psychology, 11, 361-375.

Edited book chapters

Coombes, L. & Te Hiwi, E. (2007). Social justice, community change. In I. M.Evans, M. P. O’Driscoll & J. J. Rucklidge (Eds.), Professional Practice of Psychology in Aotearoa/New Zealand (pp.379-396). Wellington, NZ: The New Zealand Psychological Society.

Coombes, L. & Morgan, M. (2004). Politicising mothers: Counter-narratives of mothering experience. In M. Bamberg & M. Andrews (Eds.), Considering counter narratives. Narrating, resisting, making sense (pp.38-41). Philadelphia: John Benjamin.

Research Reports:

Morgan, M., Coombes, L., & McGray, S. (2007). An evaluation of the Waitakere Family Violence protocols: Preliminary report. Palmerston North, Aotearoa/NZ: Massey University.

Coombes, L., Morgan, M., & McGray, S. (2007). Counting on protection: A statistical description of the Waitakere Family Violence Court. Palmerston North, Aotearoa/NZ: Massey University.

Morgan, M., Coombes, L., Te Hiwi, E., & McGray, S. (2007). Accounting for safety: A sample of women victims’ experiences of safety through the Waitakere Family Violence Court. Palmerston North, Aotearoa/NZ: Massey University.

Coombes, L., Morgan, M., McGray, S., Te Hiwi, E. (2008). Responding together: An integrated report evaluating the aims of the Waitakere Family Violence Court protocols. Palmerston North, Aotearoa/NZ: Massey University.

 

Professor Andrew Lock

BSc(Hons) Nott., PhD Hull, C.Psychol, FBPsS

 

Expertise

Discourse Processes, Human Evolution, Language Development, Narrative Therapy

Professional Interests

Child Psychology, Discourse Processes, Human Development, Human Evolution, Language Development, Narrative Therapy, Social Psychology

Andy Lock is a Professor of Psychology at Massey's Palmerston North campus. His original research interests were centred in how meanings are negotiated in early adult-infant interactions, and how this negotiative process leads the infant into using symbols for communicative purposes, and thus moving from pre-verbal to verbal forms of communication (e.g., Action, Gesture and Symbol: The Emergence of Language, Academic Press and The Guided Reinvention of Language, Academic Press). This interest in the construction of human abilities in interactive negotiation has underwritten his subsequent work in cross-cultural psychology (e.g., co-editor with P.L.F. Heelas, Indigenous Psychologies: The Anthropology of the Self, Academic Press) and the evolutionary eleboration of symbolic abilities (e.g., co-editor with C.R. Peters, Handbook of Human Symbolic Evolution. Oxford University Press). He is currently completing a co-authored book with Tom Strong, Social constructionism: sources and stirrings, Cambridge University Press, on the historical background to constructionist ideas and their implications for psychological practice.

Andy directs the Postgraduate Diploma in Discursive Therapies, which uses web-based media to include many of the main international centres of practice and research into the teaching of local and international graduate students. Contributors to this programme are listed below

Recent relevant Publications

(in press) Lock, A. and Strong, T. Social constructionism: sources and stirrings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

2006    Strong, T. and Lock, A. Discursive therapy? Janus Head 8: 585-93.

2005    Lock, A. J., Epston, D., Maisel, R. and de Faria, N. Resisting anorexia/bulimia: Foucauldian perspectives in narrative therapy.  British Journal of Guidance and Counselling 33: 315-332.

2004    Lock, A. J., Epston, D. and Maisel, R. Countering that which is called anorexia. Narrative Inquiry 14: 275-301.

 

Dr Antonia Lyons

Senior Lecturer
BA(Hons), PhD

 

Expertise

health psychology; gender and health; alcohol, gender and identity; menopause; women's health; media and health

Professional Interests

social psychology, health psychology, gender, identity, media representations

Recent Publications:

Books

Lyons, A.C. & Chamberlain, K. (2006). Health Psychology: A Critical Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Selected Refereed Journal Articles

Thornhill, K., Lyons, A. C., Nouwen, A. & Lip, G. Y. H. (In press). Experiences of living with congestive heart failure: A qualitative study. British Journal of Health Psychology.

Treharne, G.J., Lyons, A.C., Booth, D.A.,& Kitas, G.D. (In press). Psychological well-being across 1 year with rheumatoid arthritis: Coping resources as buffers of perceived stress. British Journal of Health Psychology.

Lyons, A. C., Dalton, S. I. & Hoy, A. (2006). ‘Hardcore drinking’: Portrayals of alcohol consumption in young women’s and men’s magazines. Journal of Health Psychology, 11(2), 223-232.

Anderson, I. & Lyons, A.C. (2005). The effects of victim’s social support on attributions of blame in female and male rape. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 35, 1400-1418.

Treharne, G.J., Lyons, A.C., Booth, D. A. & Kitas, G.D. (2005). Well-being in rheumatoid arthritis: The effects of disease duration and psychosocial factors. Journal of Health Psychology, 10, 457-474.

Lyons, A. C. & Forde, E. M. E. (2004). Food allergy in young adults: Perceptions and psychological effects. Journal of Health Psychology, 9(4), 497-504.

Treharne, G.J., Lyons, A.C. & Kitas, G. (2004). Medication adherence in rheumatoid arthritis: Effects of psychosocial factors. Psychology, Health and Medicine, 9(3), 337-349.

Treharne, G. J., Lyons, A. C., Booth, D. A., Mason, S. R., & Kitas, G. D. (2004). Reactions to disability in patients with early versus established rheumatoid arthritis. Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, 33, 30-38.

Cope, C.D., Lyons, A.C., Rylance, M., Donovan, V & Kilby, M.D. (2003). Providing letters and audiotapes to supplement a prenatal diagnostic consultation: Effects on later distress and recall. Prenatal Diagnosis, 23, 1060-1067.

Robertson, E. & Lyons, A.C. (2003). Living with puerperal psychosis: A qualitative analysis. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 76, 411-431.

Lyons, A.C. & Griffin, C. (2003). Managing menopause: A qualitative analysis of self-help literature for women at midlife. Social Science and Medicine, 56, 1629-1642.

McCarthy, S., Lyons, A.C., Weinman, J., Talbot, R. & Purnell, D. (2003). Do expectations influence recovery from oral surgery? Psychology and Health, 18, 109-126.

Lyons, A.C. & Farquhar, C. (2002). Past disclosure and conversational experience: Effects on cardiovascular functioning while women talk. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 32(10), 2043-2066.    

Lyons, A.C., Fanshawe, C. & Lip, G. K (2002). Knowledge, communication and expectancies of cardiac catheterisation: The patient’s perspective. Psychology, Health and Medicine, 7(4), 461-467.

Treharne, G.J., Lyons, A.C. & Tupling, R.E. (2001). The effects of optimism, pessimism, social support, and mood on the lagged relationship between daily stress and symptoms. Current Research in Social Psychology [On-line], 7(5). Available: http://www.uiowa.edu/~grpproc/crisp/crisp.7.5.htm.

Langman CM, Lyons AC, & Lip GHY. (2001). Perceptions and behaviour of hypertensive patients - A Divine intervention or a case for Hippocrates? British Journal of Human Hypertension, 15, 751-754.

Lyons, A.C. (2000). Examining media representations: Benefits for health psychology. Journal of Health Psychology, 5(3), 343-352.

Lyons, A. C., Spicer, J, Tuffin, K. & Chamberlain, K. (2000). Does cardiovascular reactivity during speech reflect self-construction processes? Psychology & Health, 14, 1123-1140.

Lyons, A. C. & Spicer, J. (1999). A new measure of conversational experience: The Speaking Extent and Comfort Scale (SPEACS). Assessment, 6(2), 189-202.

Lyons, A.C. & Willott, S. (1999). From suet pudding to superhero: Representations of men’s health for women. Health, 3, 283-302.

Lyons, A.C. & Chamberlain, K. (1998). Daily events and physical symptoms: Effects of event type, optimism, pessimism, and health behaviors. Current Research in Social Psychology [On-line], 3(8). Available: http://www.uiowa.edu/~grpproc/crisp/crisp.3.8.htm

Chamberlain, K., Stephens, C. & Lyons, A. C. (1997). Encompassing experience: Meanings and methods in health psychology. Psychology and Health, 12, 691-709.

Morgan, M., Stephens, C., Tuffin, K., Praat, A. & Lyons, A. C. (1997). Lawful possession: A constructionist approach to jealousy stories. New Ideas in Psychology, 15, 71-81.

Lyons, A. C., Stephens, C., Morgan, M., Praat, A. C., & Tuffin, K. F. (1996). Constructing New Zealand: Common linguistic resources in New Zealand political discourse. Australian Journal of Communication, 23 (1), 77-90.

Morgan, M., Tuffin, K. F., Fredrikson, L., Lyons, A. C. & Stephens, C. (1994). The New Zealand health reform advertisements: What are they all about and what will they mean to you? New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 23, 28-35.

Lyons, A. & Chamberlain, K. (1994). The effects of minor events, optimism and self-esteem on health. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 33, 559-570.

 

Dr C A (Mandy) Morgan

Associate Professor
BA(Hons) PhD Murd.,DipEd Curtin

 

Expertise

Discourse Analysis, Domestic Violence, Feminist Psychology, Narrative Psychology, Research Methods

Consultancy Experience

Domestic Violence, Qualitative Research Methodology

Professional Interests

Discourse Analysis, Domestic Violence, Feminist Methodology, Narrative Psychology, Post-Structuralism, Qualitative Methodology

Current research interests:

I am currently principal researcher for the Domestic Violence Interventions and Services Research Programme.  The programme involves critical discursive research on the ways in which service and intervention providers and users understand their experiences.  The research programme aims to identify possible solutions to problems of service delivery by systematic analysis of discourses mobilised by service providers to explain domestic violence within the context of their work. So far, we have talked with police (on two occassions), lawyers, doctors, men who have attended stopping violence programmes, women whose partners have attended programmes, and women who have used legal interventions to try to end violence in their relationships. Current projects involve speaking with refuge workers, judges and women who have had experience of police intervention, specifically.  Papers from completed projects are published and in preparation.  In addition to this programme I am involved in a diverse range of feminist poststructuralist theoretical and research projects.

Publications:

Refereed Journals

Bügelt, P., Morgan, M. & Pernice, R. (in press). Staying or Returning: Pre-Migration Influences on the Migration Process of German Migrants to New Zealand. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology.

Kahu, E.R. & Morgan, M. (in press). Choosing a life path: Contradictions and commonalities in the valuing of caring and working by government policy and first time mothers. NZ Research in Early Childhood Education Journal.

Pond, R., & Morgan, M. (in press). Protection, manipulation, or interference? Discourse analysis of New Zealand lawyers' talk about supervised access and partner violence.Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology.

Bürgelt, P.T., Morgan, M., & Pernice, R. (in press). The migration process through the eyes of migrants: Experiences, interpretations and responses of German migrants to New Zealand. Institute for Migration Research and Intercultural Studies-Beiträge.

Kahu, E. R., & Morgan, M. (2007). Weaving cohesive identities: New Zealand women talk as mothers and workers. Kotuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online, 2, 55–73.

Kahu, E. R., & Morgan, M. (2007). A critical discourse analysis of New Zealand government policy: Women as mothers and workers. Women’s Studies International Forum, 30, 134-146.

Hindle, S., & Morgan, M. (2006). On being a refuge worker: Psycho-social impacts of advocacy. Women’s Studies Journal, 20(1), 32-47.

Morgan, M., Coombes, L., & Campbell, B. (2006). Biculturalism, gender and critical social movements in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Still speaking from psychologies’ margins. Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 5, http://www.discourseunit.com/arcp/5.htm

Panikkar, R., & Morgan. M. (2005). The amok of the Malay: a culture-bound or ‘native-bound’ syndrome? International Journal of Critical Psychology, 15, 64-84.

Pond, R., & Morgan, M. (2005). Women’s experiences of using lawyers for domestic violence in New Zealand: Criticisms and Commendations. Women’s Studies Journal, 19(2), 79-106.

Morgan, M. (2005). Remembering embodied domination: questions of critical/feminist psy-discourse on the body. Theory and Psychology, 15, 357-372.

Coombes, L., & Morgan, M. (2004). Narrative form and the morality of psychology’s gendering stories. Narrative Inquiry, 14, 303-322.

Coombes, L., Morgan, M., Tuffin, K., & Johnson, M. (2004). Critical Legal Psychology: Readings of the relationship between psychology and law informed by critical legal studies and critical psychology. International Journal of Critical Psychology, 11, 30-49.

Cheals, K., Morgan, M., & Coombes, L. (2003). Speaking from the margins: An analysis of women’s spirituality narratives. International Journal of Critical Psychology, 8, 55-72

Morgan, M. (2002). Working the narrative unconscious: Positioning theory and moral order. Narrative Inquiry, 12, 467-475.

Coombes, L., & Morgan, M. (2002). Speaking of counter-narratives: Enunciative politics and commentry on memories of mother. Narrative Inquiry, 12, 375-379.

Morgan, M., & Coombes, L. (2001). Subjectivities and silences. Theorising an experience of silence as a speaking subject. Feminism and Psychology, 11, 361-375.

Coombes, L., & Morgan, M. (2001). Speaking spirituality: A discourse analysis of ten women's accounts of spirituality. The Australian Psychologist, 36, 10-18.

Morgan, M., & O’Neill, D. (2001). Pragmatic poststructuralism (II): an outcomes analysis of a stopping violence programme. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology 11, 277-289.

O’Neill, D., & Morgan, M. (2001). Pragmatic poststructuralism (I): Participant observation and discourse in evaluating violence intervention. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 11, 263-275.

Tuffin, K., Morgan, M., & Stephens, C. (2001). Jane’s jealousy: A narrative analysis of emotion experience in its social context. International Journal of Group Tensions, 30, 55-68.

Tuffin, K., Morgan, M., Frewin, K., & Jardine, A. (2000). Economic rationalism in action. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 29, 30-36.

Morgan, M. (1999). Touches of the institution: An informal curriculum of teaching about violence towards women. Women's Studies Quarterly XXVII (1&2)185-196.

Morgan, M. (1998). Speaking subjects, discursive worlds: Readings from Discourse and Social Psychology. Theory and Psychology, 8, 359-376.

Morgan, M. (1998). Discursive acts: Reading Discourse and Social Psychology - Eleven years after. Theory and Psychology, 8, 389-398.

Morgan, M., Stephens, C., Tuffin, K., Praat, A., & Lyons, A. (1997). Lawful possession: A constructionist approach to jealousy stories. New Ideas in Psychology, 15, 1, 71-81.

Praat, A., Tuffin, K. F., Frederikson, L.G., Lyons, A.C., Stephens, C., & Morgan, M. (1996). Political discourses in New Zealand: Constructions of political parties. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 25, 29-35.

Lyons, A. C., Stephens, C., Morgan, M., Praat, A., & Tuffin, K. F. (1996). Constructing New Zealand: Common linguistic resources in New Zealand political discourse. Australian Journal of Communication, 23, 77-90.

Morgan, M. (1996). Reading the rhetoric of crisis. Theory and Psychology, 6, 267-286.

Stephens, C., Lyons, A.C., Tuffin, K.F., Frederikson, L.G., & Morgan, M. (1994). Mr Spiers' speech: A `patient focused' discourse analysis. Health Care Analysis, 2, 192-195.

Morgan, M., Tuffin, K. F., Frederikson, L.G., Lyons, A.C., & Stephens, C. (1994). The Health Reform Advertisements: What are they all about and what will they mean to you? New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 23, 28-35.

Edited book chapters

Branney, P., Morgan, M., Gough, B., & Madill, A. (2006).  Reading the construction of gendered subjectivities in the politics of domestic violence intervention: merging critical discourse analysis and psychoanalysis. In A. KuczyDska and E. K. Dzikowska (Eds.), Understanding sex and gender: Zrozumie pBe III.  Wroclaw, Poland: Oficyna Wydawnicza ATUT.

Morgan, M. (2004). Fantastic bodies: Post-positivist psychology, science fiction and some problematics of discursing biomedical technologies. In N. Gavey, A. Potts, & A. Weatherell (Eds.), Sex and the body. New Zealand: Dunmore Press.

Coombes, L. & Morgan, M. (2004). Politicising mothers: Counter-narratives of mothering experience. In M. Bamberg & M. Andrews (Eds.), Considering counter-narratives. Narrating, resisting, making sense (pp.38-42). Amersterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Morgan, M. (2004). Working the narrative unconscious: Positioning theory and moral order. In M. Bamberg & M. Andrews (Eds.), Considering counter-narratives. Narrating, resisting, making sense (pp.332-340). Amersterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.

Morgan, M. (2004). Understanding domestic violence: discursive analyses of talk about violence interventions. In W. Drewery & L. Bird, Human development in Aotearoa. A journey through life (2nd ed.) (pp.318-320). Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Morgan, M. (1999). Discourse, health and illness. In K. Chamberlain & M. Murray (Eds.), Qualitative health research. Sage: London.

 

Dr Christine Stephens

Senior Lecturer
MA DipSocSci PhD DipTchg

 

Expertise Health psychology, health promotion, community health
Professional Interests Health Promotion, Health Psychology, Qualitative Methods

Recent publications:

Stephens, C., & Addis, N. (in press). Evaluation of a police debriefing programme: Outcomes for police officers five years following a police shooting. International Journal of Police Science and Administration

Paddison, C. A. M., Alpass, F., & Stephens, C. (in press). Psychological variables account for variation in metabolic control and quality of life among people with type 2 diabetes in New Zealand. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

Alpass, F., Towers, A., Stephens, C., Fitzgerald, E., Stevenson, B., & Davey, J. (in press) Independence, wellbeing and social participation in an ageing population. Annals of the New York Academy of Science.

Breheny, M. & Stephens, C. (in press). Breaking the cycle: Constructing intergenerational explanations for disadvantage. Journal of Health Psychology.

Noone, J., & Stephens, C. (in press). Men, masculine identities, and health care utilisation. Sociology of Health and Illness,

Breheny, M. & Stephens, C. (in press). Strengthening adolescent mothers’ social support. Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counselling.

Stephens, C. & Pugmire, L. (in press). Daily organisational hassles and uplifts as determinants of psychological and physical health in the New Zealand Police. International Journal of Police Science and Administration

Stephens, C. (2008). Social Capital in its place: Using social theory to understand social capital and inequalities in health. Social Science & Medicine, 66, 1174-1184.

Stephens, C., & Breheny, M. (2007). Menopause and the virtuous woman: The importance of the moral order in accounting for medical decision making. Health, London, 12 (1), 7-24.

Stephens, C. (2007). Participation in different fields of practice: Using social theory to understand participation in community health promotion. Journal of Health Psychology, 12(6), 949-960.

Hewitt, A. M., & Stephens, C. (2007). Healthy eating among 10-13 year old New Zealand children: Understanding choice using the theory of planned behaviour and the role of parental influence. Psychology, Health & Medicine, 12 (5), 526-535.

Breheny, M. & Stephens, C. (2007). Individual responsibility and social constraint: The role of research in constructing adolescent motherhood. Culture, Health & Sexuality, 9, 333-346.

Huddleston, L., Stephens, C. & Paton, D. (2007). An evaluation of the effects of traumatic and organisational experiences on the psychological health of New Zealand police recruits. Work: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment, & Rehabilitation, 28 (3), 199-207.

Paddison, C. A. M., Alpass, F., & Stephens, C. (2007). Deconstructing distress: The contribution of cognitive patterns to elevated distress among people with type 2 diabetes. European Journal of Diabetes Nursing, 4 (1), 23-33.

Stephens, C. (2007). Community as practice: Social representations of community and their implications for health promotion. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology,17, 103-114.

Breheny, M. & Stephens, C. (2007). Irreconcilable differences: Health professionals’ constructions of adolescence and motherhood. Social Science & Medicine, 64, 112-124.

Paton, D., Huddlestone, L., & Stephens, C. (2006). Conceptualizing traumatic stress in police officers: Pre-employment, critical incident and organizational influences. Traumatology, 12, 170-177.

Stephens, C., Pachana, N., & Bristow, V. (2006). The effect of hormone replacement therapy on mood and everyday memory in younger mid-life women. Psychology, Health & Medicine, 11, 461-469.

Stephens, C., Bristow, V., & Pachana, N. (2006). HRT and everyday memory at menopause: A comparison of two samples of mid-aged women. Women & Health, 43(1), 37-58.

Frewen, K., Stephens, C., & Tuffin, K. (2006). Re-arranging fear: Police officers’ discursive constructions of emotion. Policing and Society, 16, 243-260.

Dr Keith Tuffin

Associate Professor
MA PhD DipSocSc DipTchg

 

Expertise

Discursive Psychology, Racism, Social Psychology

Professional Interests

Critical Psychology, Discursive Psychology, Social Psychology

Recent Publications

Tuffin, K. Racist discourse in Australasia: Reviewing the last 20 years. Social and Personality Psychology Compass (In press).

Tuffin, K., & Frewin, K. (2008). Constructing the law: Discourses and social practices. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 18 (1), 68-82.

Frewin, K., Tuffin, K., & Rouch, G. (2007). Managing identity: Adolescent fathers talk about the transition to parenthood. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 36 (3), 161-167.

Tuffin, K., & Rouch, G. (2007). Constructing adolescent fatherhood: Positive transformations. In Z.Pearce (Ed.) Proceedings of the Combined 7th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society’s Psychology of Relationships Interest Group and International Association for Relationship Research Conference (pp. 100-106). Melbourne: Australian Psychological Society.

Bowker, N., & Tuffin, K. (2007). Understanding positive subjectivities made possible online for disabled people. New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 36 (2), 63-71.

Frewin, K., Stephens, C., & Tuffin, K. (2006). Re-arranging fear: Police officers discursive constructions of emotion. Policing and Society, 16 (3), 243-260.

Bowker, N., & Tuffin, K. (2006). Transcending operating barriers online for disabled bodies. Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counselling, 12, (1), 46-61.

Kendall, R., Tuffin, K., & Frewin, K. (2005). Reading Hansard: The struggle for identity in Aotearoa . International Journal of Critical Psychology, 16, 122-145.

Augoustinos, M., Tuffin, K. & Every, D. (2005). New racism, meritocracy and individualism: Constraining affirmative action in education. Discourse and Society, 16 (3), 315-339.

Graham, V., & Tuffin, K. (2004). Retirement villages: companionship, privacy and security. Australasian Journal on Aging, 23 (4), 184-188.


Contributors to the Massey Discursive Therapies Programme

Here listed in alphabetical order of surname are the contributors to the Discursive Therapies Programme. More information on the programme can be found here




Dr Harlene Anderson

Harlene Anderson, PhD, is a founding member of the Houston Galveston Institute and the Taos Institute. She is recognized internationally as a leader in the field of family therapy and for the development of a postmodern collaborative approach. Harlene has authored and co-authored numerous professional writings including her book Conversation, Language, and Possibilities - A Postmodern Approach to Therapy.



Professor Michael Bamberg

Michael Bamberg is Professor of Psychology at Clark University, Worcester, Massachussetts. His present work is in the area of the development of narrative skills in children across different languages and cultures. His books, The Acquisition of Narratives (1987), Narrative Development (1997) and Narrative Identity (2000) document his contribution to an emerging field of cross-cultural discourse study. He is the joint editor of the journal Narrative Inquiry, the leading journal in that field.



Dr Saliha Bava

Dr Saliha Bava is the Associate Director of the Houston-Galveston Institute, and is responsible for co-ordinating the contributions of Institute staff to the module on Collaborative language Systems therapy in 175.772 Contemporary Therapeutic Perspectives. Her PhD thesis took advantage of the Virginia policy that encourages students to submit electronic, hypertext theses. She has consequently brought a number of new skills into the Discursive Therapies Programme.



Dr John Briggs

Dr John Briggs is presently the Executive Director of Solutions Behavioural Health Group in Wisconsin. This group is closely associated with the founding Center for Solution Focused Brief Therapy of Steve de Shazer and Insoo Kim Berg in Milwaukee. He collaborates on theoretical issues in therapy with Professor Gale Miller and is an experienced therapeutic trainer, presenting many workshops on SFBT. He is jointly responsible with Professor Miller and Dr Zakutansky for our module on SFBT in 175.772 Contemporary Therapeutic Perspectives.



Dr Susanna Chamberlain

Dr Susanna Chamberlain is a Family Therapist currently in private practice in Brisbane, and was previously a Lecturer in the School of Justice Studies, Queensland University of Technology. Her therapeutic training was with the Dulwich Centre in Adelaide, which is the originating Therapy Centre for Narrative Therapy. She has developed and teaches the Narrative Therapy module that forms the first part of 175.772 Contemporary Therapeutic Perspectives.



Professor Ken Gergen

Kenneth Gergen is Gil and Frank Mustin Professor of Psychology at Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania. He has been a major influence in social psychology since his and P. Davies's 1967 book on The Self. His role since then has been as an increasingly penetrating and respected critic of psychological practice, his 13 books including the 1991 award winning The Saturated Self. Among his more recent books are Therapy as Social Construction (co edited with S. McNamee), 1992; Realities and Relationships: Soundings in Social Construction, 1994; the 2nd Edition of Toward Transformation in Social Knowledge (1994); and An Invitation to Social Constructionism (1999) and (with Professor Mary Gergen) Social Construction: A Reader (2003), which is used as a text in this programme.



Professor Mary Gergen

Mary Gergen is Professor of Psychology at Pennsylvania State University. She has been influential in a number of research areas, both on the theoretical level and as an innovative empirical researcher. Her recent work has contributed directly to the understanding of narrative and its place in social psychological explanations; feminist approaches in psychology (e.g., her books, Feminist Thought and the Structure of Knowledge,1988 and Feminist Reconstructions in Psychology: Narrative, Gender and Performance, 2001); and organizational theory. Her joint book (with Professor Kenneth Gergen) Social Construction: A Reader (2003) is used as a text in this programme.



Professor Rom Harré

Rom Harré is a New Zealander by birth. He was the Chair of the Sub-department of Philosophy at the University of Oxford and concurrently Professor of Social Psychology at Georgetown University, Washington D.C. until his recent retirement. He has authored 30 books and edited another 25 in the past 35 years, both in the Philosophy of Science and the foundations of Social Psychology. His 1972 book, co-authored with P.F.Secord, The Explanation of Social Behaviour became a 'Citation Classic', and is the foundation source of modern social psychology. Rom was a student of the founder of Speech Act philosophy, J.L.Austin (a pupil of Wittgenstein), a philosophy which is at the root of both Cognitive Science and current interests in language and discourse as they illuminate the `human condition'. Among his more recent books are The Discursive Mind (with G. Gillett), 1992; Discursive Psychology in Practice (with P. Stearns), 1995; Rethinking Psychology, 1995, Rethinking Methods in Psychology, 1995 (both with J. A. Smith and L. van Langenhove), The Singular Self 1998, and Cognitive Science: A Philosophical Introduction (2002).



Dr Vincent Hevern

Vincent Hevern is currently Chair of the Department of Psychology at LeMoyne College, Syracuse, NY. His PhD is in clinical psychology, and he is a Licensed Psychologist in the State of New York, where he worked as a clinical psychologist for seven years before joining the faculty at LeMoyne College. He has compiled the largest available set of Web resources on Narrative Psychology in support of the course he teaches on that subject. His pages focus upon narrative perspectives in psychology and allied disciplines and provide an interdisciplinary guide to bibliographical and Internet resources concerned with "the storied nature of human conduct" broadly conceived. He is the Internet Editor for the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (Divison 2 of the American Psychological Assn.), with a brief 'to foster Net based pedagogical work'.



Lynn Hoffman

Lynn Hoffman is one of the most distinguished Family Therapist's of the past 50 years. Her biography reads like a Who's Who of contemporary Family Therapy. Her 1981 book Foundations of Family Therapy was published in 7 languages and has been through 15 editions, being the primary text for Therapy training for two decades. She subsequently became associated with the Milan School of Gianfranco Cecchin and Luigi Boscolo, and along with Peggy Penn authored Milan Systemic Family Therapy 1984, the now classic statement of this approach. Recently, her book Family Therapy: An Intimate History, 2000 has become another classic text in the field, and is a core text in the Massey programme. She is still active at the age of 81, and is a regular contributor to our course 175.776 Professional Issues in Contemporary Practice.



Dr Lois Holzman

Lois Holzman is the director of the East Side Institute for Group and Short Term Psychotherapy in New York. Advocating a cultural approach to human learning and development, she has made the writings of Lev Vygotsky relevant to psychotherapy. Dr Holzman has helped to develop social therapy, the non-psychological approach to human development and learning created by Fred Newman. Dr Holzman has written or edited nine books and over sixty articles on human development and learning, psychology, education and social therapy; among them: Performing Psychology: A Postmodern Culture of the Mind; Schools for Growth: Radical Alternatives to Current Educational Models; Lev Vygotsky: Revolutionary Scientist (with Fred Newman); and Psychological Investigations: A Clinician's Guide to Social Therapy (with Rafael Mendez).



Dr Sue Levin

Dr Susan Levin is the director of the Houston Galveston Institute, overseeing clinical, training and research programs. She also serves as an adjunct professor at Our Lady of the Lake University's Houston graduate program in marriage and family therapy, and is an associate of the Taos Institute. Sue has been with the Institute since 1982 when she began her practice as a therapist, and has had the privilege of working closely with Harry Goolishian and Harlene Anderson, who are the founders of the therapeutic school of 'collaborative language systems' which Institute staff teach in 175.772 Contemporary Therapeutic Perspectives. She has written or co authored seven publications, several of which address her interest in "collaborative research practices".



Dr Valerie Lewis

Dr Valerie Lewis was a clinical child psychologist at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, the Los Angeles Probation Department and the Houston Centre for the Retarded before moving to Western Australia in 1971 to establish the Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling Psychology at Curtin University of Technology. Between 1981 and 2002 she concentrated on her private practice while continuing to teach courses in clinical psychology and clinical geropsychology at Curtin. She is a contributor to 175.776 On-line Seminar in Professional Issues.



Professor Andy Lock

Andy Lock is Professor of Psychology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand, and is Co-ordinator of the Discursive Therapies Programme. He was editor of a collection of papers on the transition from prelinguistic communication to first words in Action, Gesture and Symbol: The Emergence of Language (1978), approaching early language development from a Vygotskyean perspective. His interest in the emergence of symbol systems resulted in the jointly edited book the Handbook of Human Symbolic Evolution (1996)(with Charles Peters).



Professor Gale Miller

Gale Miller is Professor of Sociology in the Department of Social and Cultural Science at Marquette University, Milwaukee. His publications deal with social problems theory, human service institutions, and interaction. His most recent book is Becoming Miracle Workers: Language and Meaning in Brief Therapy (1997). It provides a detailed exploration of brief therapy as a postmodern approach to personal and family troubles. Based on twelve years of research and observation, Miller's book describes in practical detail how this method is employed in one of the most prominent brief therapy centres in the world, the Brief Family Therapy Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.



Dr Fred Newman

Fred Newman, PhD, is the founder of the East Side Institute for Group and Short Term Psychotherapy. Dr Newman is a co-contributor to 175.777 Special Topic: Introduction to Social Therapy with Dr Lois Holzman. For three decades, Dr Newman has been the catalyst for building sustained, community-based developmental psychological, educational and cultural projects. Among his books, co-authored with Lois Holzman, are Unscientific Psychology: A Cultural-Performatory Approach to Understanding Human Life, The End of Knowing: A New Developmental Way of Learning, and Lev Vygotsky: Revolutionary Scientist. He has also written books for a popular audience and he is the author of nearly 30 plays, four of which were written for American Psychological Association conferences.



Dr Lois Shawver

Lois Shawver, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst. She publishes on a broad range of topics and is on the editorial board of the American Journal of Psychoanalysis. She has also served as an expert witness in a large number of United States and Canadian trials on a variety of issues related to human sexuality. Her testimony has been used by both state and national governmental agencies as well as by plaintiffs suing these agencies. Her most recent paper, 'Psychoanalysis and Postmodernism', was published in the American Journal of Psychoanalysis. Her most recent book is And the Flag Was Still There: Straight People, Gay People and Sexuality in the U.S. Military. She has been teaching a seminar on Wittgenstein on the internet since 1996.



Professor John Shotter

John Shotter is Emeritus Professor and former Chair of the Department of Communication at the University of New Hampshire; he was previously Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Utrecht. He is currently joint editor of the Sage series 'Inquiries in Social Constructionism' with Kenneth Gergen (above). He is one of the founders of the social construction paradigm in social psychology, through a series of books dating back to 1976 (one co-authored with Alan Gauld (Human Action and its Psychological Investigation, 1977) (see, for example, Conversational Realities: Constructing Life through Language, 1993). In addition to his work in social psychology, John is also recognised as a major interpreter of the philosophy of Wittgenstein.



Dr Tom Strong

Tom Strong is an Assosciate Professor in the Graduate Counselling Psychology program at the University of Calgary, and a therapist in private practice. A counsellor and educator with over twenty years of front line experience, he recently returned to academic life, bringing with him a practical focus on how a discursive perspective can enhance the collaborative practice of therapy, research, health care, education and supervision. His publications on these themes can be found in journals such as Family Process, the Journal of Systemic Therapies, Gecko, Human Systems, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, and The Journal of Collaborative Therapies. Tom is a contributing editor to The New Therapist, A South African journal for front line practitioners. His present writing and research focuses on how requests are articulated and negotiated in professional and lay conversations.



Kiwi Tamasese

Kiwi Tamasese is the co-ordinator of the Pacific Island section of the Family Centre, Lower Hutt, and currently leads an HRC funded research programme on Samoan mental health needs. She is a regular keynote speaker at international conferences in the areas of family therapy and policy, and community development. She is also a dynamic workshop presenter. Along with her colleagues Charles Waldegrave, Flora Tuhaka and the Reverend Walpiri Campbell, she is one of the founders of a position called 'Just Therapy', and is the author of materials that are included in 175.773 Principles of Just Therapy, and 175.774 Issues of Culture and Gender in Psychological Practice.



Charles Waldegrave

Charles Waldegrave is a psychologist, a family therapist, an Anglican priest, a social policy analyst and researcher. He is the Pakeha (European) Co-ordinator of the Family Centre. He leads the Social Policy Research Unit there and is also a joint leader of the New Zealand Poverty Measurement Project, funded by 2 ongoing FoRST grants. He has published extensively in all the above areas, including 21 papers in refereed journals. Charles leads workshops and educational events regularly in New Zealand and internationally.



Dr Theresa Zakutansky

Theresa Zakutansky is Vice-President of Solutions Behavioural Health group where she practices in collaboration with Dr John Briggs. She is also the secretary of the Solution Focused Brief Therapy Association. She is an experienced workshop presenter, and a regular contributor, with Professor Miller and Dr Briggs, to our module on SFBT in 175.772 Contemporary Therapeutic Perspectives.