CARE White Paper Issue 4: March 2020

COVID-19 Wage Subsidy Package

by Christine Elers (Ngā Hau), Junior Research Officer, Center for Culture-centered Approach to Research & Evaluation (CARE)

We are writing about the government’s covid-19 wage subsidy package, in particular:

  • the sick leave payment due to be folded into the modified covid-19 wage subsidy package; and
  • the online publication outlining the names of all employers who have received the covid-19 wage subsidy package.

CARE Expresses Its Solidarity with our Activist-In-Residence Jolovan Wham

CARE’s Activist-in-Residence Jolovan Wham has surrendered himself to serve a 1 week jail sentence today, March 31 2020, for criticising Singapore’s judiciary.

In his statement posted on Facebook, Jolovan voiced:

“I’m doing this in lieu of a 5k fine because I do not recognise the legitimacy of the judgment and the law, both of which are unjust.

It should never be an offence to speak your truth. Decades of oppression and persecution have resulted in the normalisation of fear. It is so normalised that we have become indifferent to injustice, especially political injustice and threats to our civil rights. We have shrugged it off so much that over time, we’ve become numb to it, instead of feeling outraged.

If we can’t speak up, assemble freely, and campaign without looking over our shoulders, the reforms we want can only be done on the terms of those in power. We will have to wait for when they are ready. All this could take years, decades, or never at all. Or we can only pick issues which are considered ‘low hanging fruit.

All the levers of change are controlled and those who don’t follow the script are persecuted. We are so muted, we can only plead, but never make our demands as equals.

Acts of non-violent resistance and disobedience has to be one of the tools we use to open up our already shrinking civil and political space and to empower ourselves. It often starts with one person, or a small group of people, but over time, with persistence and repetition of action, the space will enlarge and we will progress, one step at a time.

We need to speak our truths, and to do so, we should refuse to fear. I refuse to be complicit in the diminishment of my spirit: resistance is no longer a choice in a system determined to de-humanise you.

There should be a role for those who not only negotiate the boundaries but transgress them. Not everyone can take this position and I understand those who can’t because the costs may be high; my privilege, on the other hand, allows me to take greater risks, and for that I am grateful.”

Sharing below an interview conducted by Professor Mohan Dutta with Jolovan on the topic of authoritarian repression and strategies for social change. Also sharing Jolovan’s public talk as activist-in-residence at CARE. CARE stands with you in solidarity, because as you say so eloquently, “Those of us who can risk it, should. Those who can’t, should show their support, because solidarity is the first step to change.”

A Conversation with Jolovan Wham, CARE Activist-in-Residence

Professor Mohan J Dutta sits down with CARE Activist-in-Residence Jolovan Wham about his work in Singapore

Posted by CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation on Monday, 25 November 2019
Public Talk with Jolovan Wham

First World Authoritarianism: Lessons from SingaporeTune in for this exciting public talk with CARE Activist-in-Residence Jolovan Wham!

Posted by CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation on Tuesday, 26 November 2019

CARE OPED: COVID19 – India’s Underclasses and the Depravity of Our Unequal Societies

What COVID19 makes visible


Article: COVID19 – India’s Underclasses and the Depravity of Our Unequal Societies

“It takes a pandemic to render visible the deep inequalities that make up the highly unequal societies we inhabit. As pandemics go, the power of COVID19 lies in its mobility, along the circuits of global capital, picked up and carried by the upwardly mobile classes feeding the financial and technology hubs of capital.

The irony of neoliberal globalization lies in the disproportionate burden of accelerated mobilities borne by the bodies of the poor at the global margins. The poor, whose bodies are the sites of neoliberal extraction, are also the bodies to be easily discarded when crises hit.

The images of throngs of people, the poor, now expelled from their spaces of precarious work at the metropolitan centers of financial and technology capital, spaces that are projected as the poster-models of mobility in development propaganda, walking on the long walk home, are circulating across our mobile screens.

Images of a migrant worker dead after the gruelling walk home, a mother pulling her daughter as they try to make their way home, a young man bursting into tears at the sight of food, a father walking as he carries his sleeping daughter on his shoulders, crowds of workers waiting in long lines to board buses, these are the faces of the unequal India made visible by COVID19.

These images of emaciated men and women, with little children, carrying pots, torn down bags and dilapidated beddings on their heads, walking on the roads and highways that form the infrastructures of the new India are haunting reminders of the masses of displaced people expelled by wars, riots, genocides, and famines.”

By: MOHAN J.DUTTA | 29 MARCH, 2020

Source:https://www.thecitizen.in/

CARE’S COVID-19 RESPONSE

CARE has been responding to COVID19 through our community advisory groups, community workshops, and community researchers. The communities we have been working in have been creatively developing a wide range of interventions, advocacy, and activist solutions. Please click the link below to explore our policy briefs, white papers, and interventions addressing COVID-19 based on the key tenets of the CCA

LIVE interview with Dr. Phoebe Elers on Radio Waatea about Poverty Is Not Our Future campaign

Dr. Phoebe Elers, CARE Massey spoke on Radio Waatea about the forthcoming launch of #PovertyIsNotOurFuture campaign. Waatea News and interviews are broadcasted on all 21 radio stations of the Iwi Radio Network.

LIVE interview on Radio Waatea

Interview with Dr Phoebe Elers on Radio Waatea about the forthcoming launch of Poverty Is Not Our Future campaign. Radio Waatea news and interviews are broadcasted on all 21 radio stations of the Iwi Radio Network.

Posted by Poverty Is Not Our Future on Monday, 10 February 2020

To know more, follow us on our campaign page- Poverty Is Not Our Future or visit CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and… website
#PovertyIsNotOurFuture #Auckland #GlenInnes #CAREMassey #MasseyUni #MasseyCJM #CAREResearch #NewZealand #waateanews #IwiRadioNetwork #NZPol

Culturally-Centering Communication and Social Change: Dalit Development

An informative lecture by Professor Mohan J Dutta about Dalit Development

Culturally-Centering Communication and Social Change: Dalit Development

An informative lecture by Professor Mohan J Dutta about Dalit Development

Posted by CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation on Thursday, 6 February 2020

Professor Mohan J Dutta Dean’s Chair In Communication & Director, CARE, Massey University

Follow us on :Facebook @CAREMassey or click below

https://www.facebook.com/CAREMassey

CARE Presents: Of Labor & Love – A Film by Omer Nazir

A recount of the lives of two workers in Indian brick Kilns who are bonded to debt.

Being in debt has become a normal condition in financialised capitalist economies. Student loans, mortgages, credit cards, consumer loans or pay day loans are common. The normalisation and prevalence of debt has produced what noted Italian Marxist theorist Maurizio Lazzarato terms as “indebted man”.

In Western economies, a market exists for debt and is managed by banks or other regulated lending institutions. In developing countries, in addition to the banks; local lenders, including employers or their intermediaries, not only serve the demand for debt, but use the debt to create relations of dependence, producing not simply indebted people, but debt bonded labourers – a form of modern day slaves. The film recounts the life and conditions of two workers in Indian brick kilns who are bonded to the debt owed to their employers, local lenders and to grocers, and in doing so demonstrates the disciplinary effects of debt.

Conceptualized by Craig Prichard, Ozan NadirAlakavuklar & Omer Nazir

Not Part Of My World- An Anti Racism Initiative

Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE) @CAREMassey

& Carncot School @CarncotSchool

presents

NOT PART OF MY WORLD – Anti-racism Initiative

NOT PART OF MY WORLD – Anti-racism Initiative by @CAREMasseyNZ & @CarncotSchool.

CARE have teamed-up and worked on an anti-racisim project with Carncot School and here are a few glimpses of the project.

https://youtu.be/14O2JLg-rP4 via @YouTube

#NotPartOfMyWorld #AntiRacism#CAREMassey #MasseyCJM #MasseyUni #CarncotSchool #Aotearoa #NewZealand

Project Synopsis:

Across the globe we see the rise of racism. Especially concerning is the way in which hate is used to produce violence. It is in this backdrop that the Center for Culture Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE) collaborated with Carncot School to create a project that
sought to help us understand the problem of racism and more importantly create ways of addressing racism. So it really is my privilege to introduce these short snippets for you
that highlight the work done by the students at Carncot with the support of the principal Dr. Owen Arnst.

What you will see in these videos are the ways in which students think about the world of racism, the world of hate and the dialogues they open up through their invitation to connect
to build relationships and to imagine a better world that is free from hate. What happened as part of this project is that the students worked in small groups to first understand
the problem of racism within the context of their comfort zones.

They thought about their comfort zones and what really makes them feel comfortable within these zones, then they
grappled with the idea of difference, what does it mean to recognize difference and what does it mean to relate to difference. Once they grapple with these two questions of
comfort zone and difference they then created an anti-racist campaign that highlighted this idea that racism has no place in our world.

EVENT UPDATE: Upcoming CARE Anti-Racism Week events online- 21-23 March 2020

Kia Ora,

Message sent on behalf of Prof Mohan Dutta (Director, Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE)) following up on the earlier email, below are the updated event posters and the online livestream links to CARE’s Anti-Racism Events between 21-23 March 2020

21 March @ 2 pm – #EndTheHate Campaign Launch – ONLINE

Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/218154419241534/

Livestream link: @CAREMassey

22 March  @ 4 pm – ONLINE

#ENDTHEHATE: Strategies for dismantiling hate

Guest speaker: Anjum Rahman

Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/2715896505203833

Facebook livestream Link: https://www.facebook.com/CAREMassey/videos/1380049082185971/

23 March @ 5 pm – ONLINE

CARE Event: Connecting Anti-Racist Struggles: From Indigenous Resistance To Refugee Rights

Guest speaker: Marise Lant

Event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1041743546196044/

Facebook livestream Link: https://www.facebook.com/CAREMassey/videos/2757140504340482/   

CARE COVID-19 WHITE PAPERS

CARE White Paper Issue 4: March 2020

COVID-19 Wage Subsidy Package

Christine Elers (Ngā Hau), Junior Research Officer, Center for Culture-centered Approach to Research & Evaluation (CARE)

We are writing about the government’s covid-19 wage subsidy package, in particular:

  • the sick leave payment due to be folded into the modified covid-19 wage subsidy package; and
  • the online publication outlining the names of all employers who have received the covid-19 wage subsidy package.

CARE White Paper: Issue 3 April 2020

The limits of the “Singapore Model” in COVID-19 response: Why authoritarian governmentality is not the solution

Mohan J. Dutta, Director, Center for Culture-centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE)

A wide range of models have been proposed as frameworks for responding to Covid-19. These models highlight
the significance of health
communication in preventing the spread of COVID19 as well as in effectively responding to it. The positioning of specific models as solutions to COVID-19 is tied to the creation of actual strategies of response
globally. One such model that has been rapidly disseminated in policy discourse and circulated in articulations of COVID response is the “Singapore Model.” Drawing on the key tenets of the CCA, this paper will examine the premise of the “Singapore Model” as a framework for global health.

The white paper draws on the key tenets of the CCA to examine Singapore’s pandemic response. The CCA foregrounds the interplays of culture, structure, and agency in the constructions of health meanings and the development of health solutions.

Structure refers to the political
economy of organizing resources in society. Culture reflects the community norms, community-based meanings, and community values guiding relational negotiations of health and wellbeing. Agency reflects the relational and collective capacities of communities to develop solutions.


CARE White Paper: Issue 2 March 2020

A culture-centered approach to pandemic response: Voice, Universal Infrastructure, and Equality

Mohan J. Dutta, Director, Center for Culture-centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE)

The global nodes of spread of Covid-19 highlight the significance of health communication in preventing the spread as well as in effectively responding to it. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Noting the aggressive movement of the virus across countries, with eight countries reporting more than 1000 cases of COVID-19, the WHO declared COVID-19 as a pandemic. Drawing on critical analyses of the pandemic and crises response literatures as well as building on the experiences of CARE in developing culture-centered community grounded interventions,this white paper outlines the culture-centered approach to pandemic response, specifically directed at offering culturecentered guidelines for effective communication. The culture-centered approach foregrounds the interplays of culture, structure, and agency in the constructions of health meanings and the development of health solutions


CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation + Te Tiriti Based Futures -21-28-March 2020 Events

Upcoming CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation Events during the National Anti-racism week.

Te Tiriti-based Futures + Anti-Racism 2020 is an innovative (inter)national, online and offline, Tiriti-based, anti-racism and decolonisation event in Aotearoa. CARE is proud to be partnering and participating is this community driven event that will run for 10 days starting 21 March 2020.

RSVP on @CAREMassey events below

21 MARCH 2020
2PM – 4PM City Library PNCC, Events centre
White Paper Launch:
The Experience & Effects of Racisim in Aotearoa New
Zealand.
#Photovoice
#ichoosehighbury launch

22 MARCH 2020
4PM City Library PNCC,Events centre
#ENDTHEHATE: Stratergies for dismantiling hate.

5:30PM
MOVIE SCREENING: Waru.
koha entry

23 MARCH 2020
4PM – 7PM City Library PNCC,Events centre
Connecting anti- racist struggle: From indigenous resistance to refugee rights.- Marise Lant

24 MARCH 2020
6PM – 8PM
Dismantaling Racisim with Andrew Judd, Marise Lant and the Feilding Advisory board.

26 MARCH 2020
11AM – 1PM St. Michael’s Marae Highbury
The Racist Roots Of Colonialism Speakers: Rodney Graham & Marise Lant.

4PM – 7PM Youth Space Youth Voice For Social Change -Dismantaling Racism.

-5:30PM Youth Panel Online Stratergies For Challenging Hate
Skype presentation
-Tauiwi Tautoko
-Q&A with Laura, Action Station, Director

27 MARCH 2020
2PM – 4PM Japan LT MASSEY
– CARE Public Panel: “Islamophobia, Hindutva, & Hate”

28 MARCH 2020
11AM – 11:45AM
#ENDTHEHATE Bus ride

12PM – 4PM PNNC – Square
“Community Dialouge On Anti-Racism ”
-Looking Forward
-Poetry, Open mic, Spoken word
-Poster making #ENDTHEHATE

#EndTheHate #WhakamutuaTeMauāhara#TeTiritiBasedFutures + #AntiRacism2020

CARE Event: Pizza and conversation about racism

Have YOU experienced racism at @MasseyUni? Share your stories over
FREE pizza with us at CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation

Come & join us at CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation
Time: 4:00PM
Place: BUSINESS STUDIES CENTRAL GROUND FLOOR ROOM 1.06
If you get lost ring!
0800MASSEY extn 85662
#AntiRacismWeek2020#TeTiriBasedFutures2020#CAREMassey#MasseyUni

CARE Visiting Lecture -Public Talk – Dr. Laura Miller -University of Tennessee

Communicating about cancer: Considerations for identity and uncertainty management

Date: Thursday, 20 Feb 2020 Time: 12pm – 1pm
Location: BSC 1.06 CARE Lab, Manawatu campus. Massey University
RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/1526896230798430/

Talk Abstract:
Communicating about cancer presents many challenges for patients and their families. Uncertainty is prevalent across the survivorship trajectory; specifically, questions regarding recurrence, unexplained symptoms, and renegotiating relational roles all may persist after cancer treatment is completed. This talk will consider the communication processes and uncertainty management strategies patients and families engage in throughout a cancer experience and beyond.

Short Bio:
Laura Miller received her PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee in the USA. Her works explores how individuals communicate about health, how families communicate support amid health stressors, and how illness-related uncertainty is managed. She is passionate about global education and has taught in Beijing, Dublin, and Sydney.

CARE WHITE PAPER SERIES Exploring challenges: A Culture-Centred Approach (CCA) project in Glen Innes

Dr Phoebe Elers, Dr Steve Elers and Professor Mohan Dutta

This study explores the challenges experienced by residents in Glen Innes, Auckland. The findings have assisted in the identification of local problems and corresponding solutions, including the ‘Poverty is Not Our Future’ campaign, which has served as anchor for residents to challenge dominant structures and, at the same time, communicate their everyday realities of poverty. While this study is focused on Glen Innes, material hardship continues to be a significant issue in Aotearoa New Zealand, with research determining that 13 percent of children lived in households that experienced material hardship in the 2017/18 financial year (Statistics New Zealand, 2019) and that children born into disadvantage in Aotearoa New Zealand have a significant likelihood of remaining disadvantaged (New Zealand Treasury, 2016a, 2016b; Templeton, 2016).

Link to the White Paper :https://www.massey.ac.nz/~wwcare/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/Poverty-is-Not-Our-Future-White-Paper-1.pdf