CARE Director’s article on Al Jazeera: ‘A window of opportunity’

‘A window of opportunity’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But some analysts have been more explicit in their analysis, and suggested ending the threat posed by the alt-right and Islamophobia will only be achieved by shifting existing mainstream narratives about Muslims, both locally and internationally.

“The terrorist attacks in Christchurch reflect the global rise in Islamophobia – hatred toward Muslims – cultivated by political parties, media organisations, and a wide range of hate industries,” Mohan Dutta dean’s chair in communication at the New Zealand-based Massey UniversityUniversity, wrote last week.

Dutta also called for discussions “anchored in the voices of Muslims experiencing hate” as the “starting point to halting the global spread of Islamophobia”.

Mire agreed and called on New Zealand to set the standard in battling back Islamophobia and the rise of “alt-right extremist ideologies”, which he said threaten minorities “everywhere” in the world.

“It’s sad to think that a situation like this is what drives us to have these difficult and hard discussions,” Mire said.

“But we have a small window of opportunity, right now, and we must take it in order to ensure that such events never happen again.”

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Read the detailed news article on #ALJazeera‘s website.

#CAREDirectorsBlog– Mohan Dutta ‘s article on Al-Jazeera #Islamophobia #NewZealand
#CAREMassey #CAREMasseyNZ #MasseyCJM #MasseyUni

CARE ACTIVIST IN RESIDENCE PROGRAM-WHITE PAPER LAUNCH BY DR. JAMES GOMEZ AND Prof. MOHAN DUTTA

Message from Director of CARE Prof. Mohan Dutta, about the White Paper: Fake News, Digital Democracy and State Repression by Dr. James Gomez & Prof. Mohan Dutta and CARE’s collaboration with Asia Centre.

 

 

 

Sue Bradford takes up residence as Massey University’s activist at CARE

“Activists and academics are not typical bedfellows, but Sue Bradford is making sure the two parties can learn from each other.

The well-known activist and former Green Party MP is the activist in residence at Massey University in Palmerston North for a week. Bradford was asked about a month ago by professor Mohan Dutta​, who is the dean’s chair of communication for the new Centre for Culture-Centred Approach to Research and Evaluation, to take the position.

The two are producing a paper on the partnership between academics and activists in struggles of the oppressed.  Universities often have an artist in residence, but having an activist is not as common. “This question around the relationship between people who are active outside in grassroots organisations and how people inside the universities can work together is quite fraught and difficult because there are often problems,” Bradford said. “But there are also huge advantages to both. It has never been an easy path in this country.”

She said this week was an opportunity to explore the relationship between activists and academics.”Often, academics are seen as people that come in and do research on us, do their PhDs on us.” She wasn’t given any instruction about what she could do while being the activist in residence. Bradford said there wasn’t the same level of political activity in this generation of students as there had been in the past.

On Wednesday, she spoke to students about her background in the 1980s and 1990s working with an unemployment workers group and unions, and on Thursday she held a workshop with Manawatū activists and students. At 2pm on Friday she is speaking about social movements and her history in and out of Parliament, having previously been an MP for 10 years.

“It’s a completely new experience but at the same time I’m into new experiences and finding out about new people.”

Bradford said the CARE centre worked on transforming structures through communication, culture and community, and that’s what she had spent her life doing, so was keen to be involved. Bradford works for the Kotare Trust in Auckland, which does research in education for social change in Aotearoa.

Dutta brought the CARE centre with him to Massey from the National University of Singapore and he is a leading scholar for health communication and is a researcher of indigenous rights and activism. He said the work of CARE was about creating communication platforms for democratic spaces so communities in disenfranchised places had a voice. The centre also looks at poverty and health for migrants and refugees.”

Article Source: www.stuff.co.nz 

Article Link: https://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/news/107443172/sue-bradford-takes-up-residence-as-massey-universitys-activist 

Click on the url link for media related articles on Sue Bradford

 

 

CARE Activist in Residence: Public Talk by Dr. Sue Bradford- Live Streaming

Wednesday 3rd OCTOBER, 2018, 1.00 pm – 2.00 pm

Public Talk: SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, PARTY POLITICS, AND STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION: NAVIGATING A PATH FORWARD IN CHALLENGING TIMES

GLB3.08 | Geography Building, Manawatu campus | MBS1.42 Massey Business School Seminar Room, Auckland campus | 5D12 Communication Lab, Wellington campus

Mediasite: https://webcast.massey.ac.nz/Mediasite/Play/491fa9258f244193a9172fb0fefc9f9c1d

Please click on the URL link for more media related articles on Sue Bradford 

“Food Insecurity in Singapore: The Communicative (Dis)Value of the Lived Experiences of the Poor”

“Food Insecurity in Singapore: The Communicative (Dis)Value of the Lived Experiences of the Poor” – This journal article co-authored with Naomi Tan, Satveer Kaur, Prof Mohan Dutta, and Nina Venkataraman just got published in the Health Communication! Here is a link for 50 free downloads. Link:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10410236.2016.1196416 Abstract: “Food insecurity is a form of health disparity that results in adverse health outcomes, particularly among disenfranchised and vulnerable populations. Using the culture-centered approach, this article engages with issues of food insecurity, health, and poverty among the low-income community in Singapore. Through 30 in-depth interviews, the narratives of the food insecure are privileged in articulating their lived experiences of food insecurity and in co-constructing meanings of health informed by their sociocultural context, in a space that typically renders them invisible. Arguing that poverty is communicatively sustained through the erasure of subaltern voices from mainstream discourses and policy platforms, we ask the research question: What are the meanings of food insecurity in the everyday experiences of health among the poor in Singapore? Our findings demonstrate that the meanings of health among the food insecure are constituted in culture and materiality, structurally constrained, and ultimately complexify their negotiations of health and health decision making.”

NUS CARE researchers assisting Willing Hearts charity to prepare and distribute food to recipients in Singapore

NUS CARE researchers assisting Willing Hearts charity to prepare and distribute food to recipients in Singapore

Fortifying Migrant Workers in Singapore

With our “Respect Our Food Rights” campaign launched last year, we partnered with DSM and BOP Hub to address the micronutrient deficiencies faced by our Migrant Construction Workers in Singapore due to the poor quality meals they received. This video below showcases the soft launch of the ‘45Rice’ project in delivering micronutrient-rich rice to this migrant community and eventually the wider public at large in Singapore. The concept of “Hidden Hunger” is introduced and they addressed the issue through the strategy of producing and supplying this micronutrient-rich rice. Our Director, Prof Mohan Dutta, was present to give his insights about the event and the fortified rice that was served.

Prof Mohan and the Deconstruction of the News Hour Debate on Feb 10

So what makes up news? Prof Mohan analyses an episode of the “News Hour Debate” to address the role of the Indian media in cooking up the anti-nationalism debate in India. By providing a few points to lay out the criteria of what makes news, Prof Mohan then deconstructs the Feb 10 episode and goes on to highlight the role of the media in shaping the national conversation and in driving public opinion in a one-sided manner. He also addresses how the media here serve as propaganda tools of the state. Watch the clip below.

[FEBRUARY TALKS] Dr Binod C Agrawal and Dr Tejaswini Niranjana

Last month, CARE invited Dr Binod Agrawal and Dr Tejaswini Niranjana to give a talk on their research they have done in India. Dr Binod shared with us his research on how satellite communication technology has performed and developed in India while Dr Tejaswini presented her research on the process of becoming a woman in India in the age of globalisation. You can watch the recordings of both talks below. Enjoy!

[12 FEBRUARY] DR BINOD C AGRAWAL PROMISES AND PERFORMANCES OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR DEVELOPMENT IN INDIA

[24 FEBRUARY] DR TEJASWINI NIRANJANA THE REORGANISATION OF DESIRE: CULTURAL LIVES OF YOUNG WOMEN IN GLOBALISING INDIA

[DAY03] Communication for Social Change: Intersections of Theory & Praxis

For the final day of our conference, we had a plenary by Dr. Raka Shome and Dr. Ambar Basu on the topic of “Open Dialogue on Subalternity” and one in the afternoon with our collaborators from HOME and Project X addressing the topic on “Academic-Activist Partnerships in Creating Spaces for Social Change”. We also had 2 panel sessions where the presenters shared their research work on the themes of “Communicating for Social Change” and “A Culture-Centered Approach to Social Change”. We ended the conference with a closing keynote by Mr P.V. Satheesh from the Deccan Development Society.

Plenary 03 – Open Dialogue on Subalternity

Panel 03 – Communicating for Social Change: In Action

Plenary 04 – Academic-Activist Partnerships in Creating Spaces for Social Change

[DAY02] Communication for Social Change: Intersections of Theory & Praxis

For the second day of our “Communication for Social Change: Intersections of Theory & Praxis” conference, CARE had the honour of having Professor Collins O. Airhihenbuwa as the opening keynote speaker along with Dr. Ambar Basu and Professor Barbara Sharf to deliver the plenary sessions. We also had 2 different panel sessions on “Theoretical Articulations of Social Change” and “Social Change Methodologies” presented by different speakers from around the region.

Leadership for Social Justice in Global Health Communication: Why Culture Matters

Plenary 01 – Culture-Centered Method: Postcolonial Interrogations

Panel 01 – Theoretical Articulations of Social Change

Plenary 02 – Gun Violence as a U.S. Public Health Concern: A Case of Narrative Inattention

Panel 02 – Social Change Methodologies