CARE Activist-In-Residence: Teanau Tuiono- The Solidarity Project

Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE) proudly invites Teanau Tuiono as our next Activist-In-Residence from 5th – 9th August and we would like to share some insights about Teanau’s project for his residency – The Solidarity Project.

The Solidarity Project is all about exploring conversations of solidarity and whānaungatanga across cultures and communities. Teanau has over 20 years’ experience as an activist, advocate and organiser at local, national and international levels on social justice and environmental issues. In Pasifika communities he is known for his work in the education sector and climate change advocacy. In Māori communities he is known for his indigenous rights activism. He has an interest at working at the intersection of indigenous rights and environmental issues where he has worked with remote indigenous communities on the frontlines of climate  change and biodiversity loss.

Have a look at the his talks and conversations below for some insights about the project, more to follow in the coming days.

 

 

Come and join us at the CARE Events:

PUBLIC TALK
WEDNESDAY, 07 AUGUST 2019 12:00PM,
PALMERSTON NORTH CITY LIBRARY EVENTS CENTRAL ( GROUND FLOOR)
LIVESTREAM ON CARE FB PAGE: https://www.facebook.com/CAREMassey/videos/341724333429636/ 

WHITE PAPER LAUNCH
FRIDAY, 09 AUGUST 2019, 10:00AM
CoMMS LAB, B.109 MASSEY UNIVERSITY, MANAWATU CAMPUS
LIVESTREAM ON CARE FB PAGE: https://www.facebook.com/CAREMassey/videos/372259300150168/

RSVP  on Facebook: Activist-In-Residence- Teanau-Tuiono

CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation invites all to our upcoming event: Activist-In-Residence- Teanau Tuiono

CARE: Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation

Invites all to our upcoming event: Activist-In-Residence-Teanau Tuiono.

Abstract:

With the rise of white nationalism and white supremacy, how can Tangata Whenua, Pasifika, Migrant and Refugees of Colour build solidarity between their communities? Teanau’s Activist-in-Residence will explore the activist experiences of solidarity and whanaungatanga across cultures and communities.

Teanau has over 20 years’ experience as an activist, advocate, and organiser at local, national, and international levels on social justice and environmental issues. In Pasifika communities he is known for his work in the education sector and climate change advocacy. In Maori communities he is known for his indigenous rights activism.

He has an interest at working at the intersection of indigenous rights and environmental issues where he has worked with remote indigenous communities on the frontlines of climate and biodiversity loss.

Events:

PUBLIC TALK
WEDNESDAY, 07 AUGUST 2019 12:00PM,
PALMERSTON NORTH CITY LIBRARY EVENTS CENTRAL ( GROUND FLOOR)
LIVESTREAM ON CARE FB PAGE

WHITE PAPER LAUNCH
FRIDAY, 09 AUGUST 2019, 10:00AM
CoMMS LAB, B.109 MASSEY UNIVERSITY, MANAWATU CAMPUS
LIVESTREAM ON CARE FB PAGE

RSVP on Facebook: @CAREMassey

CARE Op-Ed: The role of communication in addressing Māori health disparities: An appeal for voice by Prof. Mohan Dutta & Dr.Steve Elers

The role of communication in addressing Māori health disparities: An appeal for voice


 

The Māori Affairs Select Committee on Māori health inequalities point to the entrenched disparities in health outcomes for Māori compared to Pākehā, highlighting the importance of examining and understanding the sources of these inequalities.

The sources of inequalities in outcomes in health and wellbeing is also the subject of the hearings of the Waitangi Tribunal, drawing on presentations that point to systemic structural racism that impact the experiences of Māori in the health system.

These inequalities in experiences of and with health and care are communicative, tied to the nature of interactions in health settings and in the various ways in which racism shapes these interactions.

In our research with the culture-centred approach to health and communication, we attend to the question of voice in the realm of unequal health outcomes. We suggest that the erasure of Māori voices in health interactions and in how the health system is constructed is integral to the perpetuation of inequalities.

Our approach therefore invites voices of those at the margins of society, voices that have been historically erased, as anchors for addressing the entrenched health inequalities.

We are honoured to be hosting Tāme Iti of Ngāi Tūhoe as our next activist-in-residence, and we will work with him in understanding this question of voice. His intervention from the Māori proverb “kanohi ki te kanohi” [dealing with it face-to-face] is a powerful solution to the marginalisation of Māori in health systems. Making the spaces for Māori voices to be heard in health systems and in spaces where knowledge is produced is a critical starting point for addressing inequalities in health and wellbeing outcomes.

When such voices from the margins of New Zealand society speak, they are meant to disrupt the unequal structures. The very act of speaking is meant to disrupt because it is only through disruption of powerful structures that erase voice can opportunities for solving inequalities be created.

Because for those in entrenched positions of power, voice is threatening, an invitation to voice is a direct challenge to the organising categories of power.

That within Universities and within mainstream structures of society a certain cross-section feels threatened with the voice of Tāme Iti speaking is a reflection of the communicative inequalities that constitute colonial structures. Under the guise of civility and appropriate conduct, voices that challenge the status quo and its inherently racist logics are strategically and systematically silenced. So for many of the free speech advocates within colonial structures, the right of an indigenous voice to speak can be sacrificed under the pretext of appropriate speech.

It is however in this very space of voice that interventions need to be made if inequalities in outcomes of health and wellbeing are to be addressed.

Professor Mohan Dutta

Director of Centre for Culture-Centred Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE)

and

Dean’s Chair of Communication, School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing

Massey University

 

Dr Steve Elers

Senior Lecturer

School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing

Massey University

CARE Activist-In-Residence in News: Stuff -‘Activist Tāme Iti to take up residence at Massey’

Activist Tāme Iti to take up residence at Massey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well-known Māori activist Tāme Iti will be Massey University’s next activist in residence.

He will be on the Palmerston North campus from March 18 to 22 as the activist in residence, a programme where an activist shares ideas with academic staff.

The purpose of the programme is to generate knowledge and an activist brings in different experiences.

The theme of Iti’s residency is “decolonising ourselves – indigenising the university”.  He will hold a public talk, workshop, and release a paper. All events are open to the public.

Iti will be hosted by the Centre for Culture-Centred Approach to Research and Evaluation, which is a research centre within the school of communication, journalism and marketing, and the Massey business school.

Professor Mohan Dutta, director of the centre and dean’s chair of communication, said Iti’s residency would empower the voices of the marginalised.

“Tāme’s knowledge and expertise provide key theoretical anchors for us to critically engage and interrogate colonisation and racism, and the structural conditions that reproduce inequality,” Dutta said.

He said this semester the centre was exploring inequality in health and wellbeing.

“Tāme’s name came up because of his work in communication opportunities and opportunities of voicing particular claims and how those will translate into inequality in outcomes, and in health and well being.”

As part of the theme, Tāme Iti said it was important to “know your enemy – hongi hongia te whewheia”.

“The enemy out there, and the enemy internally – in ourselves,” he said.

The centre hosts a different activist in residence each month.

Activist and former Green Party MP Sue Bradford was the first activist in residence in October.

Bradford worked with Dutta on a paper about the partnership between academics and activists in struggles of the oppressed.

Dutta brought the centre with him to Massey from the National University of Singapore. He is a leading scholar for health communication and is a researcher of indigenous rights and activism.

READ MORE: Sue Bradford takes up residence as Massey University’s activist

Source:  Stuff Limited

Article & Image Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/news/111056676/activist-tme-iti-to-take-up-residence-at-massey

 

Maori Television -“iti-become-Masseys-Activist-Residence”

iti-become-Masseys-activist-residence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The CARE center (Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation) situated in the School of Communication at Massey’s Palmerston North campus hosts a different activist in-residence every month.  From 18–22 March, Tūhoe elder and Māori activist, Tame Iti, will take up the role.

‘Decolonising Ourselves – Indigenising the University’ is the theme for Iti’s placement which will include workshops, a public talk and the release of a white paper.

Professor Mohan Dutta, Director of CARE says what Iti has to offer through his placement will assist in “empowering the voices of the marginalised as anchors to social transformation”.

“Tame’s knowledge and expertise provide key theoretical anchors for us to critically engage and interrogate colonisation and racism and the structural conditions that reproduce inequality,” says Dutta.

Iti says that it is important to “Know your enemy – hongi hongia te whewheia”.

“The enemy out there, and the enemy internally – in ourselves,” says Iti.

For more information including dates/times and venues please refer to the CARE website

All the events are open to the public and the public talk will be live streamed on Facebook.

 

CARE’s Activist-In-Residence: Tāme Iti on Radio WaateaNews

Iti shares vision as activist in residence with WaateaNews.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tūhoe provocateur Tame Iti is to give his views on how to decolonise yourself to students and the public at Massey University’s CARE center, also known as the Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation.

The centre at the university’s Palmerston North campus hosts a different activist in residence every month for talks and workshops.

Director Mohan Dutta says his knowledge and experience provide a way for students to critically engage and interrogate colonisation and racism and the structural conditions that reproduce inequality,

Mr Iti will draw on the whakatauki hongi hongiā te whewheiā, know your enemy, and ask whether the enemy is in ourselves.

He says everyone is colonised.

“But the way we are indigenised where we are today is really important. There needs to be some recognition and respect to tangata whenua. We are not trying to ditch that culture. We are saying here we are so how can we work together as a collective, the people living in this country, Pākehā are not the only other people who are here these days, the whole world is here now,” Mr Iti says.

Tame Iti will give a public talk at Massey University at noon on March 20.

Source: https://www.waateanews.com/waateanews?story_id=MjEyNDQ

CARE Activist In Residence – Tāme Iti

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We at CARE are honoured that Tāme Iti will be CARE’s Activist-in-Residence from the 18th to the 22nd of March 2019.

Tāme’s upcoming visit comes just weeks after the United Nations Human Rights Council (2019) report reminded us of the following:

  • “The impacts of colonisation continued to be felt, through entrenched structural racism and poorer outcomes for Māori” (p. 2)
  • “Māori life expectancy was lower and unemployment rates were higher” (p. 3)
  • “inequalities within the system and mental health outcomes, especially for Māori” (p. 4)
  • “Māori were disproportionately represented at every stage of the criminal justice system, as both offenders and victims” (p. 4)

Tāme Iti is an actiivist-of-activists, bringing his art and activism together in decolonizing structures. His activism as performance offers many openings for imagining the role of communication in social cange.

Accordingly, this calls for a decolonising project to critically engage and interrogate the structural conditions that reproduce racism and poorer outcomes for Māori.  Tāme Iti’s Activist Residency will interrupt the dominant discursive positioning and practices of Pākehā hegemony and will situate the university as a site of resistance to enable new ways in which we understand and conceptualise structural racism.  We welcome Tāme Iti as our Activist-in-Residence.  “Tēnā koe e te Rangatira.  Nau mai, haere mai!” [Trans: “Greetings leader/chief. Welcome!”

RSVP to events : https://masseybusiness.asia.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8ofiQk2Yow6EDBj

Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CAREMassey/

Click on the url link for more related articles on Tāme Iti

 

CARE Activist In Residence WhitePaperLaunch by Sangeetha Thanapal & Mohan Dutta

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CARE Activist In Residence White Paper Launch:

Topic: Decolonising Racism: Imagining Anti-Racist futures by Mohan Dutta & Sangeetha Thanapal

1st March 2019 from 12.00- 100

GLB3.01 Geography Building

Manawatu campus Massey University

CARE- Activist-In-Residence- Sangeetha Thanapal- 27th February-1st March at Manawatu campus

Kia ora koutou,

As we begin this new semester we are pleased to announce that we have 2019’s First Activist-In-Residence at CARE

from 27th February-1st March at Manawatu campus.

Our theme for this semester for our Activist-in-Residence series is “Anti-racist Interventions!”

Our first activist-in-residence is the Singapore activist Sangeetha Thanapal, whose work on Chinese privilege has

intervened into the racist structures of Chinese imperialism. Here is a link to her website: http://kaliandkalki.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

She was recently interrogated and issued warning by Singapore Police for her anti-racist work under the colonial anti-sedition law:

https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/courts-crime/activist-sangeetha-thanapal-issued-stern-warning-for-facebook-post-that

Prof. Mohan Dutta  will be working with Sangeetha to share some of CARE’s ongoing work with racist structures that marginalize

Indians in South-east Asia and strategies for race-based activism. She will be presenting a Public Talk, Workshop and Whitepaper during her residency at CARE.

More event specific details to follow shortly.

Click on the url link for media related articles on Sangeetha Thanapal

Academic-activist partnerships in struggles of the oppressed

ISSUE2. (NOVEMBER 2018) 

Academic-activist partnerships in struggles of the oppressed

Dr. Sue Bradford & Prof. Mohan Dutta

In this advocacy brief, we examine the transformative capacity of collaboration between academics and activists offering a pivotal anchor for local-national-global resistance. In the white paper on academic-activist partnerships,
Dr. Sue Bradford and Professor Mohan Dutta draw from their journeys in academia and activist organizing to
examine the intersections, synergies, challenges to, and lessons for academic activist partnerships. Questioning
the meaning of collaboration and the nature of collaborative spaces in social change, the authors offer a
conceptual framework for collaboration that joins in solidarity with the struggles of the oppressed.

Bradford, D. and Dutta, P. (2018). Academic-activist partnerships in struggles of the oppressed. CARE WHITE PAPER SERIES, (Issue 2).

Article: White_Paper_Sue_Bradford_Mohan_Dutta-November 2018